How to Write Python Not Equal or Equal Code


In Python, you’ll be able to use the now not equivalent to and the equivalent to operators to test if two Python items have the similar price. This instructional will train you ways to use those operators with numerous instance code.

In this instructional you’ll be told:

  • the syntax of the now not equivalent (!=) operator and use circumstances,
  • the syntax of the equivalent operator (==) with examples, and
  • the usage of is and isn't operators to test for the id of any two Python items.

Let’s get began.

Python Not Equal Operator Syntax

For any two Python items obj1 and obj2 , the overall syntax to use the now not equivalent operator is:

<obj1> != <obj2>
  • returns True when the values of obj1 and obj2 don’t seem to be equivalent, and
  • returns False differently.

Note: As discussed above, obj1 and obj2 will also be integers, floating level numbers, strings, lists and so forth.

Python Not Equal Operator Code Examples

In this phase, let’s code a couple of examples to perceive the now not equivalent operator higher.

Using Python Not Equal Operator for Comparison

Here’s our first instance.

num1 = 27
num2 = 3*9

num1 != num2

# Output: False

You can run the code examples at the Geekflare Python IDE—proper out of your browser. Or you need to make a choice to run in your native device.

As num1 = 27, and num2 additionally evaluates to 27 (3*9 = 27), the values of num1 and num2 are equivalent. So the != operator returns False.

Let’s take every other instance.

In the code beneath, num1 is ready to 7. And num2 is ready to the string 7. As they’re of various knowledge varieties, the now not equivalent operator returns True.

num1 = 7 
num2 = "7" 
num1 != num2 

# Output: True

You solid the string to an integer, as proven:

num1 = 7
num2 = int("7")

num1 != num2

# Output: False

In this example, you’ll be able to see that the returned result’s False—as num1 and num2 are actually equivalent to the integer 7.

You too can use the now not equivalent operator with Python collections corresponding to lists, tuples, and units.

Note: For collections of information corresponding to lists, the now not equivalent operator works by means of checking the values of particular person pieces. For instance, two lists list1 and list2—every of duration n—are equivalent provided that list1[i] == list2[i] for i in 0,1,2,3,..n-1.

Here’s an instance:

list1 = [2,4,6,8]
list2 = [2,4,6,9]

list1 != list2

# Output: True

In the above instance, list1 and list2 vary by means of just one part. And the now not equivalent != operator returns True as anticipated.

Using Python Not Equal Operator in Conditionals

You’ll regularly use the now not equivalent to operator as a part of Python conditionals.

For instance, the code snippet beneath displays how you’ll be able to you’ll be able to test whether or not or now not a bunch is strange.

A bunch that’s not calmly divisible by means of 2 is strange. And this reduces to the situation numpercent2 != 0.

num = 7
if(numpercent2 != 0):
  print("The quantity is strange.")
else:
  print("The quantity is even.")

# Output: The quantity is strange.

You too can use conditionals in list comprehensions when you need to retain handiest the ones checklist components that meet a particular situation. In the instance beneath, odd_10 is the checklist of all strange numbers not up to 10.

strange = [num for num in range(10) if num%2 != 0]
print(strange)

# Output: [1, 3, 5, 7, 9]

And that completes our dialogue of the now not equivalent (!=) operator.✅

As you will have guessed by means of now the equivalent to operator produces the reverse impact of of the now not equivalent to operator.

You’ll be told extra about it within the subsequent phase.

Python Equal Operator Syntax

Here’s the syntax to use Python’s equivalent to operator:

<obj1> == <obj2>  #the place <obj1> and <obj2> are legitimate Python items
  • returns True when the values of obj1 and obj2 are equivalent, and
  • returns False differently.

Python Equal Operator Code Examples

The equivalent operator (==) can be utilized very in a similar fashion to the now not equivalent operator.

Let’s code the next examples:

  • to test if two strings are equivalent,
  • to test if a bunch is even, and
  • to use conditionals in checklist comprehension

Using Python Not Equal Operator for Comparison

In the code snippet beneath, str1 and str2are equivalent relating to price. So the equivalent operator (==) returns True.

str1 = "coding"
str2 = "coding"

str1 == str2

# Output: True
python-equals-operator
Python Equal Operator

Let’s now use the equivalent operator in a conditional expression.

Note: A bunch this is calmly divisible by means of 2 is even. And in code, this reduces to the situation numpercent2 == 0

num = 10
if(numpercent2 == 0):
  print("The quantity is even.")
else:
  print("The quantity is strange.")

# Output: The quantity is even.

Let’s now construct in this instance, use Python’s checklist comprehension to get all even numbers not up to 10.

even_10 = [num for num in range(10) if num%2 == 0]
print(even_10)

# Output: [0, 2, 4, 6, 8]

In the above instance,

  • vary(10) returns a spread object which will also be looped via to get all integers from 0 to 9.
  • The situation numpercent2 == 0 is True just for even numbers.
  • So even_10 is the checklist of all even numbers not up to 10.

So a ways you’ve discovered how to to test for equality the usage of the now not equivalent (!=) and equivalent (==) operators.

In the following phase, you’ll find out how to examine the id of 2 items. You’ll test if two Python items are equivalent.

How to Use Python’s is and isn’t Operators

 If you’re a novice in Python programming, it’s conceivable that you simply’re puzzled between the == and is operators. Let’s explain that on this phase.

In the former phase, we had an instance the place str1 and str2 the place equivalent and the == operator returned True.

Now run the next code snippet.

str1 = "coding" 
str2 = "coding" 

str1 is str2 

# Output: False

You can see that str1 is str2 returns False.

Let’s take a step again and perceive what Python’s is operator does.

The is operator operates on on any two Python items.
And returns True provided that the 2 items are equivalent—this is they refer to the similar object in reminiscence.

Even even though str1 is equivalent to str2, str1 isn’t str2 as they level to two other items in reminiscence. And subsequently, they’ve other identities.

python-is-operator
== and is are NOT the similar

In Python, you’ll be able to use the id() serve as to get the id of the thing.

▶ Run the next code cellular to get the identities of str1 and str2.

identity(str1)

# Sample output: 139935398870320

identity(str2)

# Sample output: 139935398871344

As you’ll be able to see, str1 and str2 have other identities. And str1 is str2 returns False as anticipated.

Putting it in combination,

<obj1> is <obj2> # returns True if and provided that
identity(<obj1>) == identity(<obj2>) # returns True

Let’s briefly examine this, as proven:

str1 = "coding"
str2 = str1

print(str1 is str2)
print(identity(str1) == identity(str2))

# Output
True
True

Intuitively, the isn't operator does the other of the is operator.

The isn't operator operates on on any two Python items.
And returns False provided that the 2 items are equivalent—this is they refer to the similar object in reminiscence. Otherwise, it returns True.

In the above code examples, check out changing is with isn't and test the consequences.

Conclusion 👩‍💻

Hope you discovered this instructional useful.

To summarize, you’ve discovered:

  • how to use the equivalent (==) and now not equivalent (!=) operators to test if two Python items have the similar price,
  • the variation between equality and id of Python items, and
  • how Python’s is and isn't operators assist in checking if two Python items are equivalent.

See you all within the subsequent instructional. Until then, satisfied finding out and coding!🎉

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